Standard 5: Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning

Professional practice

Standard 5

5.1 Assess student learning

Demonstrate understanding of assessment strategies, including informal and formal, diagnostic, formative and summative approaches to assess student learning.

Understanding (theory)

Assessment should always be embedded into the planning and development of lesson sequences. By implementing Biggs’ model of constructive alignment learning outcomes from curricula can be mapped across to marking rubrics which inform the design of assessment tasks.

Diagnostic assessment through informal classroom discussion and brief but formal activities (written and drawing tasks) can be completed at the beginning of a unit in order to plan appropriate and achievable lesson content. By assessing formatively through visual diaries and work in progress discussions and presentations, students are able to reflect on their development and plan for improvement. Summative assessment through the use of rubrics and thoughtful comments allows students to reflect on their experience and make informed decisions in the future. When integrated as part of an authentic learning environment students are able to use rubrics and summative assessment to plan their future engagement with learning experiences. Self assessment is also a method which encourages students to reflect and then make changes to their techniques, strategies and processes going forward.

Evidence

Formative visual diaries

Delivering constructive written feedback

Exploration proposals

Comments and rubrics as summative assessment

Mentor feedback

Through the design and delivery of a unit of work for Year 11 students completing Unit Two Studio Arts, Kevin designed and delivered effective and comprehensive criteria sheets, assessment rubrics and individual student feedback.

Andrew Landrigan

Head of Art, VCASS, 2017

5.2 Provide feedback to students on their learning

Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of providing timely and appropriate feedback to students about their learning.

Understanding (theory)

Constructive feedback is created and delivered with the aim of improving student learning outcomes and wellbeing. By practicing effective questioning techniques in the classroom I am able to monitor student progress and provide constructive feedback in the moment of learning.

Another strategy that I have used is to provide students with a progress checklist so that they can provide me with evidence of their learning (usually in a visual diary). Half way through a unit I gather up their visual diaries and provide students with formative feedback comments based on what they need to improve in order to meet the learning outcomes on the rubric. This is assessment ‘as’ learning where student progress can be improved and achievement is recognised before the unit ends. This is also a helpful method for supporting students who may not be meeting the learning outcomes.

Evidence

Formative visual diaries

Delivering constructive written feedback

Animation unit assessment

Providing comments and marked rubrics efficiently

Mentor feedback

Kevin developed effective questioning as the placement progressed to check students’ understanding of his instruction and to provide positive and constructive feedback. One on one student discussion was most effective and allowed him to cater and assist for all levels and needs.

Cheryl Kerin

Head of Art, Ave Maria College, 2016

Kevin has provided the students he has taught at the Victorian College of the Arts Secondary School with excellent, supportive, detailed and considered feedback that aimed to recognise their achievements and make suggestion and provide direction for future learning.
Kevin also delivered individual feedback to students through conversations with students during classes. The students approached Kevin for support and readily sought feedback from him about the progress of their work.

Andrew Landrigan

Head of Art, VCASS, 2017

5.3 Make consistent and comparable judgements

Demonstrate understanding of assessment moderation and its application to support consistent and comparable judgements of student learning.

Understanding (theory)

Moderating summative assessment in the Arts can be difficult due to the subjective nature of the subjects. Having a well developed rubric tied to specific learning intentions assists in mitigating this issue and helps to inform consistent and comparable judgements.

Another method for ensuring consistency is to assess student work collaboratively with peers. These teachers will bring valuable expertise to the process and provide different subjectivities. Informed by conversations and guided by rubrics, the assessment process becomes moderated and student learning is able to judged consistently.

I did this on my most recent placement with one of my mentor teachers. We split the assessment in half and came to agreements on the quality of work that was high, average and low. These initial agreements helped to inform which criteria the work met and the subsequent feedback that we gave.

Evidence

Collaborative assessment

Assessing digital archive unit with mentor

5.4 Interpret student data

Demonstrate the capacity to interpret student assessment data to evaluate student learning and modify teaching practice.

Understanding (theory)

Through the process of developing a thorough understanding of the intended learning outcomes outlined in the Victorian Curriculum and VCE Study Guides, I am able to connect key knowledge and skills to rubric criteria and constructive feedback.

By participating in this process I am then able to look back at a student’s past work and assessment data (in the form of teacher feedback, completed rubrics and conversations) and assess the student’s strengths as well as potential areas for improvement. These evaluations can then be used to guide student learning and modify my own teaching practice to meet the student’s needs.

Evidence

Reflective questions

Engaging students in reflective practice to improve teaching

Animation unit assessment

Providing comments and marked rubrics efficiently

Mentor feedback

Kevin demonstrated a very clear understanding of how outcomes are assessed and the key knowledge and skills that underpin them.

Andrew Landrigan

Head of Art, VCASS, 2017

5.5 Report on student achievement

Demonstrate understanding of a range of strategies for reporting to students and parents/carers and the purpose of keeping accurate and reliable records of student achievement.

Understanding (theory)

In my previous placement experience student attendance was monitored by marking a role via the online Compass portal. Teachers and parents/carers are then able to quickly recognise any drops in attendance as the system produces easy to read percentages and summaries.

At another school I observed students being asked to assess their engagement at the the end of each lesson on a scale of 0 to 4. This data was entered into an online spreadsheet that both teachers and parents/carers could monitor. Averages became a focal point for parent/teacher interviews, acting as a starting point for conversations around student wellbeing and performance.

Google Classroom also provides helpful tools where student assessment can be completed in a digital format. Parents/carers can then be invited into the online classroom where they can monitor student progress. This space can act as a conduit for a parent/carer/student/teacher relationship for the purpose of fostering student wellbeing and performance.

Evidence

Google docs

For developing, maintaining and sharing assessment data

Google classroom

For sharing assessment with parents, carers & students

Mentor feedback

Kevin maintained excellent notes about student progress and organised these resources for supervising teachers to access and review.

Andrew Landrigan

Head of Art, VCASS, 2017